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LATEST VITAMIN D NEWS
 
UPCOMING EVENTS, BLOG AND NEW BOOKS
New study finds more evidence for a link between vitamin D and autism
Mar 20, 2017

New research provides further evidence to suggest that sufficient vitamin D while pregnant can have health benefits for future children, with a recent Australian study suggesting that the vitamin could help prevent autism traits in offspring.

Autism -- or autism spectrum disorder -- is a lifelong condition where sufferers experience developmental disabilities such as an inability to communicate with others, interact socially, or fully comprehend the world.

In their animal study, a team of researchers from the University of Queensland's Queensland Brain Institute used the most widely accepted developmental model of autism, in which the mice behaved abnormally and demonstrated problems with social interaction and basic learning.

full story . . .
Link between Vitamin D treatment and autism prevention
Mar 17, 2017

Giving vitamin D supplements to mice during pregnancy prevents autism traits in their offspring, University of Queensland researchers have discovered.

The discovery provides further evidence of the crucial role vitamin D plays in brain development, said lead researcher Professor Darryl Eyles, from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute.

"Our study used the most widely accepted developmental model of autism in which affected mice behave abnormally and show deficits in social interaction, basic learning and stereotyped behaviours," Professor Eyles said.

"We found that pregnant females treated with active vitamin D in the equivalent of the first trimester of pregnancy produced offspring that did not develop these deficits."

full story . . .
11 surprising things you might not know about vitamin D
Mar 17, 2017

Many of us know it as the 'sunshine' vitamin that gives us strong teeth and bones.

But there's much more to it than that, which is why it's currently the vitamin on everyone's lips.

Research shows that this vital nutrient can help in a range of ways, from boosting immunity to potentially reducing the risk of a range of chronic illnesses.

Here are 11 vitamin D facts that may surprise you.

full story . . .
New study suggests more sun exposure can lead to a better brain
Mar 06, 2017

Northern BC isn’t getting enough of the sunshine vitamin!

According to a recent study with UNBC and the Northern Medical Program, a lack of Vitamin D can lead to improper brain function.

Research specialist Dr. Jacqueline Pettersen led the tests, which observed local residents and split them into two groups.

“What I found was that the high-dose group experienced a significant improvement on tasks of visual memory, which are very cognitively-demanding tasks. The low group, on the other hand, did not.”

full story . . .
Study finds Vitamin D effective for reducing flu and colds
Mar 01, 2017

TORONTO, Ont. (March 1, 2017) – People who boost their vitamin D levels with supplements reduce their risk of respiratory tract infections, such as the flu, by up to 12%, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis study of 25 randomised controlled trial (RCT) studies published recently in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The study reported that this equates to one person being spared a respiratory tract infection (RTI) for every 33 taking vitamin D supplements. The benefit is greater in those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D versus bolus or monthly dosing, with the number needed to treat dropping to 20. The impact in Canada, based on a population of 35 million people, shows vitamin D could spare 1.75 million people having one RTI per year.

full story . . .
Increased active vitamin D levels could help optimize muscle strength
Feb 22, 2017

A recent study by University of Birmingham researchers shows that muscle strength can be optimized by increasing active vitamin D levels.

Previous research demonstrated a link between inactive vitamin D levels and a lack of muscle mass. The current study, published in PLOS ONE, gathered data from 116 participants in a clinical trial that measured multiple forms of vitamin D, as well as body composition, muscle function, and muscle gene expression. The results showed that active vitamin D was associated with lean mass rather than body fat.

“By looking at multiple forms in the same study, we can say that it is a more complex relationship that previously thought,” Zaki Hassan-Smith, from the University of Birmingham, said. “It may be that body fat is linked to increased levels of inactive vitamin D, but lean mass is the key for elevated levels of active vitamin D. It is vital to understand the complete picture, and the causal mechanisms at work, so we can learn how to supplement vitamin D intake to enhance muscle strength.”

full story . . .
 
Events  
Truth About Healthy Lives Conference
Apr 08, 2017        8:00am-3:00pm

WHO WOULD NOT BENEFIT FROM A HEALTHIER, MORE BEAUTIFUL LIFE ?

Refresh your mind & join us April 8th, 2017 at

The Truth About Healthy Lives Conference - learn amazing healthy lifestyle tips from today's best & brightest innovators from the Medical, Naturopath & Homeopath fields. Pick up makeup tips from Natural Beauty Experts. Explore, Eat & Shop the Specialty Artisan Food Market (including healthy, gluten free, vegan, sugarless products & sampling). Connect & speak with leading Scientists, Nutritionalists, Vendors, Artists & Fashion Gurus. Check out the Women's Boxing Ring, recoup & find your zen at home with Interior Design & Sleep Specialists.

Together we will stimulate learning, engagement and create an open dialogue - knowledge is power!

$20.00+ Advanced Ticket Price | $25.00+ after March 17th, 2017

The extra fun part? Be sure to get your tickets early as you will automatically be entered into a Door Prize Draw! In anticipation of the event, names will be drawn weekly for prizes.

Tons of incredible, healthy lifestyle prizes to be won! Follow link for details.

www.truthabouthealthylives.com

The hashtag for this event is #EmpowerMeTO

Explore | Eat | Shop

event details
20th Vitamin D Workshop
Mar 28, 2017        

20th Vitamin D Workshop

2017
 

Orlando, FL - March 28-31, 2017

event details
Blog  
Editorial - An Epidemiologists Perspective
Mar 09, 2017

by Cedric F. Garland, Dr PH FACE, UC San Diego School of Medicine

When I was 10, I had a friend who was a terrific playmate and fellow canyon explorer. We'll call him Tom. He had a suspicious streak in him. He told me he thought that doctors knew how to prevent cancer and other diseases, but were not disclosing this to the public. I did not believe his ideas on this topic. I discounted Tom as a young fanatic, a conspiracy theorist. 
 
For about 20 years we have known that sunlight deficiency is the main cause of a terrible and progressive, ultimately disabling disease. People who grow up in Seattle have 10 times the incidence of the disease as people who grow up in San Diego. This applies across the globe - the higher the latitude, the higher the MS incidence rate. It is a law of nature and disease and has been shown through many epidemiological studies (see sidebar).
full post . . .
Lower vitamin D level linked to higher mortality rate in large European study
Feb 21, 2017

by William B. Grant, PhD

A new paper in the open-access journal reported the relation between vitamin D level and mortality rates based on a study of 26,916 individuals from a European consortium [Gaksch, 2017]. The countries involved were Denmark, Germany, Iceland, the Netherlands, and Norway. The average age of the participants at the time of enrollment ranged between 43 years in one German study to 76 years in the Iceland study. Average body mass index ranged from 23 in Denmark to 27 in one of the German studies. Women were slightly more represented than men. By the end of the studies, 6802 participants had died. The average follow-up time varied from 7.5 to 17.8 years. While vitamin D levels can change with time, the authors reported that follow-up time did not affect the findings.

So, what were the findings? All-cause mortality rate was minimal at 85 nmol/L (34 ng/mL). However, the findings were not considered significant for vitamin D levels above 50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL). This result is because there is not a one-in-twenty chance that the results for vitamin D levels above 50 nmol/L would be different from unity. At a vitamin D level of 10 nmol/L, the risk of death was 2.5 times that at 85 nmol/L.

full post . . .
Putting the Risk of Vitamin D Toxicity into Perspective
Mar 31, 2016

by Samantha Kimball, PhD, MLT

Vitamin D is unique among nutrients. Vitamin D is actually more of a hormone than a vitamin. Vitamin D is used by nearly every cell in the body. It can be obtained naturally from the sun or by ingesting it. It was named a “vitamin” when it was discovered that many people were deficient and it could be obtained from their diet, this happened because they were not getting enough from sun exposure. This is more prevalent today than ever.

If you are lucky enough to live near the equator, where you can synthesize vitamin D year-round, and you spend a minimal amount of time unprotected in the sun and fully exposed (15 minutes in a bathing suit) each day, you probably get enough vitamin D from that ball of life in the sky. However, we Canadians are not so lucky. Our northern climate means that in the winter the sun isn’t powerful enough for our bodies to make vitamin D at all and in the summer months, when it is possible to make vitamin D, most people wear sunscreen which blocks the sun and the production of vitamin D. With our extremely limited ability to obtain vitamin D naturally we need to supplement.

There is a continuous debate among vitamin D experts about how much vitamin D you need to take to be healthy. Opinions and comments like “Vitamin D has health benefits,” but “you shouldn’t take too much because it is just too risky!” are confusing and often portrayed in parallel in the media. What is missing is a little perspective.

full post . . .
Books  

Susan Rex Ryan
Defend Your Life

Defend Your Life has three main sections. The first addresses the fundamentals of vitamin D3 and its awesome benefits as well as minimal risk. The second highlights select diseases and conditions about which vitamin D3 may offer protection. The third includes the author's personal vitamin D3 story, including her theory about adequate vitamin D3 levels and how you can 'Defend Your Life'.

Reading this book will help you understand how adequate amounts of vitamin D3 are essential to enhancing your quality of life.


Ian Wishart
Vitamin D: Is This the Miracle Vitamin?

In this compelling new book,award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author Ian Wishart brings together the most up to date science on vitamin D and how it could well save your life. Cancer? Up to a 77% reduction in risk of developing it if you take this vitamin. Heart disease? The same kind of reduction. Did you know that autism, mental illness and multiple sclerosis all appear to be caused by a lack of vitamin D during pregnancy?

The lives of every single person, including you, will be affected by the information in this book. With more than 300 scientific trials and studies cited, this book is a reference guide not just for the general reader but for medical professionals alike.


 more books...

PRESS RELEASES
 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

Study finds Vitamin D effective for reducing flu and colds

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (March 1, 2017) – People who boost their vitamin D levels with supplements reduce their risk of respiratory tract infections, such as the flu, by up to 12%, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis study of 25 randomised controlled trial (RCT) studies published recently in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The study reported that this equates to one person being spared a respiratory tract infection (RTI) for every 33 taking vitamin D supplements. The benefit is greater in those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D versus bolus or monthly dosing, with the number needed to treat dropping to 20. The impact in Canada, based on a population of 35 million people, shows vitamin D could spare 1.75 million people having one RTI per year.

full press release

New Canadian study provides strong evidence that low vitamin D levels cause Alzheimer’s Disease

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (January 18, 2017) – A new scientific study published in Neurology from researchers at McGill University has provided evidence to support vitamin D as a causal risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The McGill study found that lower vitamin D levels increased the risk of Alzheimer’s disease by 25% using a Mendelian randomization (MR) methodology which minimizes bias due to confounding or reverse causation.

Alzheimer’s disease is expected to double throughout the world in the next 20 years. The Alzheimer Society of Canada estimates that approximately 747,000 Canadians are living with some form of dementia.

There is no treatment that can effectively stop the progression of Alzheimer’s disease despite considerable effort. Therefore, disease prevention through modifiable risk factors where possible is critical. Ensuring vitamin D sufficiency through increased non-burning sun exposure in summer or vitamin D supplementation may be a cost-effective approach to help reduce Alzheimer’s disease risk.

full press release

Pregnant women should increase vitamin D levels - new studies suggest

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (December 13, 2016) – New studies have shown how important it is for pregnant women to have optimal blood levels of vitamin D to help lower the risk of their babies developing multiple sclerosis and autism.

A newly published study in Neurology from Danish researchers has found that babies born within the lowest quintile of vitamin D levels had twice the risk for future multiple sclerosis (MS) as infants born in the highest quintile. This led the researchers to conclude that low concentrations of neonatal vitamin D are associated with an increased risk of MS.

Earlier this year, a study published in JAMA Neurology on data from the Finnish Maternity Cohort also found that maternal vitamin D deficiency during early pregnancy was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of MS in the offspring compared with women who did not have deficient vitamin D levels.

Adding further support for increased vitamin D supplementation for pregnant women is a new study published in Molecular Psychiatry on autism. The large population-based cohort of mothers and their children found that gestational vitamin D deficiency was associated with an increase in autism-related traits in 6-year-old children linking gestational vitamin D deficiency and altered brain development. The authors concluded: “It is feasible that a safe, cheap and publicly accessible vitamin D supplement in at risk groups may reduce the prevalence of this risk factor. Just as prenatal folate supplementation has reduced the incidence of spina bifida, we speculate that prenatal vitamin D supplementation may reduce the incidence of autism.”

full press release
 
Dr. Reinhold Vieth

Professor, University of Toronto, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.


Click to View Dr. Michael Holick, Ph.D., M.D.

Professor of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics; Director of the General Clinical Research Unit; and Director of the Bone Health Care Clinic and the Director of the Heliotherapy, Light, and Skin Research Center at Boston University Medical Center.


Click to View Dr. Cedric Garland, DrPH

Professor Emeritus in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of California, San Diego.


 more advisors...

Converter Tool

In Canada Vitamin D 25(OH)D levels are measured in nmol/L. In the U.S. it is measured as ng/ml. To convert:

Enter nmol/L: ng/ml
Enter ng/ml: nmol/L