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UPCOMING EVENTS, BLOG AND NEW BOOKS
Member’s spotlight: vitamin D and multiple sclerosis
Aug 25, 2016

I have been working since 2007 to learn about this vitamin, after receiving devastating news that my 17 year old daughter had Multiple Sclerosis. I was angry, and I wanted to understand why this happened. I read everything I could get my hands on, every journal, study, YouTube video, to see what everyone else was hearing and seeing. Diet, Epstein-Barr, obesity, genetics, so many different potential factors but the one factor that I kept seeing everywhere was vitamin D deficiency. Seemed likely since we cover in sunscreen to prevent skin cancer, avoid the sun for its damaging effects, and yet never think about what we are robbing our bodies of at the same time and not replacing.

My daughter was put on a daily injecting medication that cost us out of pocket $2200.00 each month, the insurance paid the other $3000.00. The relapses continued, her reactions continued, I grew more desperate to help her. I feared for her and her future. I feared for her life. We increased her dosage from 2000 IU daily to 10,000 IU, with her Neurologist okay. She seemed to stabilize, was it the medication finally doing its job or the increase in vitamin D? I decided to increase her to another 10,000 IUs each day for a total of 20,000 IU and after one pretty horrific physical reaction to an injection we stopped the medication all together, and waited. We used no other meds, continued on the higher dose of vitamin D daily, did labs to be sure we stayed in a safe range (74 ng/ml) and said a prayer. She continued doing well. Her fatigue abated, her energy returned she looked amazing and was a full time college student now.

full story . . .
Vitamin D Offers Hope for Multiple Sclerosis
Aug 22, 2016

By Edward R. Rosick, DO, MPH, DABIHM

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that attacks the central nervous system and affects millions of people around the world. There is not yet a cure for MS.

As an autoimmune disease, in which the body attacks its own healthy tissues and cells, MS destroys myelin, a substance that surrounds nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord1 much as insulating material wraps around electrical wire.

By destroying myelin, MS damages the nerves and leaves them unable to send electrical impulses throughout the body. This can make everything from walking to seeing to breathing an arduous if not impossible task for those affected.

While there are a few medications that treat some of the symptoms, none of them can cure or stop the disease, and they can produce side effects.2,3 Annual increases in the prices of these drugs have made many of them unattainable by some patients desperate for any respite from this debilitating illness.3

 

full story . . .
Sydney multiple sclerosis researchers link risk genes to Vitamin D
Aug 22, 2016

The further away you live from the equator the more likely you are to be diagnosed with MS.

It sounds simple. But since analysis of the genetic determiners of multiple sclerosis began in the '70s, sunlight's factoring in the disease has seemed irreconcilable with its highly complex genetic make-up. 

New research from scientists based at The Westmead Institute in Sydney has drawn a link between the genetic and environmental circumstances of multiple sclerosis, which affects 2.1 million people worldwide, most of whom are diagnosed between 20 and 40 years of age.

full story . . .
Birth control and vitamin D: what women trying to get pregnant should know
Aug 09, 2016

Getting off the pill in hopes of having a baby? A new study suggests you may encounter a side effect that could actually reduce your chance of pregnancy.

It has to do with vitamin D, which some fertility experts consider to be as important for women trying to conceive as prenatal vitamins.

The U.S. research, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that women who took estrogen-containing contraception (including the pill, patch and vaginal ring), had 20 per cent higher vitamin D levels.

When they stopped taking birth control, those vitamin D levels reportedly took a dive (researchers weren’t able to figure out how much the levels dropped).

The big takeaway?

full story . . .
Dr. Robert Heaney, expert in calcium, vitamin D, dies at 88
Aug 08, 2016

Robert P. Heaney, MD, Creighton University’s distinguished professor of medicine, world-renowned researcher in the field of bone biology and vitamin D and the first holder of the John A. Creighton University Professorship, has died of brain cancer.

It was passion that drove Heaney in all he did. First, a passion for the sciences, where he looked beyond the lab for answers in nutrition and bone health. Second, a passion for scripture, as a frequent contributor to Creighton University’s “Daily Reflections.” Finally, his passion for Creighton, where he was a proud Bluejay for 69 years until his death on Aug. 6.

Recognized by the National Osteoporosis Foundation as a “Legend of Osteoporosis,” Heaney worked with the Institute of Medicine to determine a recommended daily dose of calcium. His research elevated the conversation on the importance of calcium and vitamin D in bone-loss prevention. His contributions to the medical community brought osteoporosis into everyday conversation as an important medical condition to watch for in women.

full story . . .
UK Advises Vitamin D Supplements for Everyone – Should Canada Follow?
Aug 04, 2016

A recently released report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) in the United Kingdom is urging all Brits to take vitamin D supplements, which according to the Vitamin D Society of Canada, should give Canadians a reason to start looking at their own vitamin D intake levels.

 
Much like the UK, Canada shares the same sunshine limitations, which means because of the northern latitude of both countries, vitamin D producing sunlight can only be captured by our skin between the months of May and October. This leaves Canadians and Brits in the cold and with declining vitamin D levels in the fall and winter.
 
The downside of low vitamin D levels means that bones can become thin and brittle because vitamin D plays an important role in regulating the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body - making it essential for bone health and more.
full story . . .
 
Events  
20th Vitamin D Workshop
Mar 28, 2017        

20th Vitamin D Workshop

2017
 

Orlando, FL - March 28-31, 2017

event details
Blog  
Putting the Risk of Vitamin D Toxicity into Perspective
Mar 31, 2016

by Samantha Kimball, PhD, MLT

Vitamin D is unique among nutrients. Vitamin D is actually more of a hormone than a vitamin. Vitamin D is used by nearly every cell in the body. It can be obtained naturally from the sun or by ingesting it. It was named a “vitamin” when it was discovered that many people were deficient and it could be obtained from their diet, this happened because they were not getting enough from sun exposure. This is more prevalent today than ever.

If you are lucky enough to live near the equator, where you can synthesize vitamin D year-round, and you spend a minimal amount of time unprotected in the sun and fully exposed (15 minutes in a bathing suit) each day, you probably get enough vitamin D from that ball of life in the sky. However, we Canadians are not so lucky. Our northern climate means that in the winter the sun isn’t powerful enough for our bodies to make vitamin D at all and in the summer months, when it is possible to make vitamin D, most people wear sunscreen which blocks the sun and the production of vitamin D. With our extremely limited ability to obtain vitamin D naturally we need to supplement.

There is a continuous debate among vitamin D experts about how much vitamin D you need to take to be healthy. Opinions and comments like “Vitamin D has health benefits,” but “you shouldn’t take too much because it is just too risky!” are confusing and often portrayed in parallel in the media. What is missing is a little perspective.

full post . . .
How much vitamin D should I take?
Jan 14, 2016

This is the most common question for vitamin D. Recommending, calculating or finding the right dose of vitamin D intake for anyone is difficult. That’s because it’s complicated!

Why? Because everyone is different. Different weights, genetics, skin colour, diets, UV exposure etc. What research has shown us is that the same D3 supplementation dose given to a group of people will result in a wide range of vitamin D blood levels as determined through 25(OH)D testing.

Here is a chart published by GrassrootsHealth which shows vitamin D levels by D3 supplementation dose taken. You can see that the same dose provides a huge variation in vitamin D blood levels. How can anyone really predict where you will fall in this chart?

Recently a new Canadian research paper1 was published in the peer reviewed journal Nutrients, by a group of researchers from the University of Alberta (Veuglers 2015). They used a dual approach and a review of 108 published estimates of vitamin D supplementation to determine the optimal vitamin D dose that minimizes the risk for both a low and high vitamin D blood level.

full post . . .
The vitamin D debate is not likely to disappear
Dec 04, 2015

by Samantha Kimball, PhD, MLT

 There seems to be a line drawn in the sand with respect to the debate concerning what the optimal levels of vitamin D are for health, and neither side wants to budge. On one side of the line of the current debate are those who support the recommendations officially set by government agencies.  However, most of the researchers who actively study vitamin D consider the latest official advice to be inadequate.  

There has been contention about the vitamin D recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine (IOM, which advises both Health Canada and the United States Food and Drug Administration).  The IOM released its updated report for vitamin D and calcium in 2010. Yet several groups of vitamin D experts suggest that people should achieve ‘optimal’ levels of vitamin D status, levels that are considerably higher than the ones the IOM recommendations are based on. The IOM’s Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of 600 IU/d was calculated to achieve adequate vitamin D status which was determined to be serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels [25(OH)D] of 50 nmol/L in 97.5% of the population. On the other hand, the Endocrine Society, Osteoporosis Canada, American Geriatrics society and the European Vitamin D Association all recommend target 25(OH)D levels of at least 75 nmol/L. The Vitamin D Society, Grassroots Health and the Vitamin D Council recommend that 25(OH)D levels be maintained above 100 nmol/L which require intakes well above the RDA and even above the tolerable upper level of intake (UL) in overweight and obese individuals. Why would the subject matter experts disagree with the IOM so openly?

full post . . .
Books  

Susan Rex Ryan
Defend Your Life

Defend Your Life has three main sections. The first addresses the fundamentals of vitamin D3 and its awesome benefits as well as minimal risk. The second highlights select diseases and conditions about which vitamin D3 may offer protection. The third includes the author's personal vitamin D3 story, including her theory about adequate vitamin D3 levels and how you can 'Defend Your Life'.

Reading this book will help you understand how adequate amounts of vitamin D3 are essential to enhancing your quality of life.


Ian Wishart
Vitamin D: Is This the Miracle Vitamin?

In this compelling new book,award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author Ian Wishart brings together the most up to date science on vitamin D and how it could well save your life. Cancer? Up to a 77% reduction in risk of developing it if you take this vitamin. Heart disease? The same kind of reduction. Did you know that autism, mental illness and multiple sclerosis all appear to be caused by a lack of vitamin D during pregnancy?

The lives of every single person, including you, will be affected by the information in this book. With more than 300 scientific trials and studies cited, this book is a reference guide not just for the general reader but for medical professionals alike.


John J. Cannell, MD
Athlete's Edge - Faster, Quicker, Stronger with vitamin D

John Cannell, founder and executive director of the Vitamin D Council, provides a new perspective on the vitamin D story revealing a long-held secret once known only to Eastern European athletic trainers.

Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, improves muscle tone, muscle strength, balance, reaction time and physical endurance, as well as immunity and general health. In addition, ideal levels of vitamin D help protect you from a staggering array of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, asthma, autism and even influenza.


 more books...

PRESS RELEASES
 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

UK Advises Vitamin D Supplements for Everyone – Should Canada Follow?

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (August 3, 2016) – A recently released report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) in the United Kingdom is urging all Brits to take vitamin D supplements, which according to the Vitamin D Society of Canada, should give Canadians a reason to start looking at their own vitamin D intake levels.

Much like the UK, Canada shares the same sunshine limitations, which means because of the northern latitude of both countries, vitamin D producing sunlight can only be captured by our skin between the months of May and October. This leaves Canadians and Brits in the cold and with declining vitamin D levels in the fall and winter.

The downside of low vitamin D levels means that bones can become thin and brittle because vitamin D plays an important role in regulating the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body - making it essential for bone health and more.

full press release

Summer is the season for Canadians to naturally boost vitamin D levels

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (July 14, 2016) – With school out and vacations in full swing, Canadians will be spending more time outdoors soaking up the sun.

According to the Vitamin D Society, summer is the best time for Canadians to naturally generate vitamin D, which has many positive effects, including reducing the risk of developing serious diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis and others.

Dr. Reinhold Vieth, Scientific Advisor for the Vitamin D Society and professor at the University of Toronto, says that in addition to generating vitamin D, sunlight is known to improve mood and wellbeing. However, because of Canada’s northern latitude, our timeframe for getting the most from the sun’s rays is short – from May to October.

“Right now, we are in vitamin D summer. When the UV index is above 3 and your shadow is shorter than your height is when you can make vitamin D.” says Dr. Vieth. “For years, many strands of research have shown that people who are active in sunshine are healthier than those who avoid sun. We often assume that the health benefits of sunshine are solely due to vitamin D, but that is not proven yet.  In other words, it is likely that sunshine does more for our bodies than just produce vitamin D.”

full press release

New study questions sun avoidance in northern latitude countries like Canada

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO. Ont. (May 25, 2016) – With summer just around the corner, a new study out of the Netherlands has questioned if sun-avoidance advice actually benefits a person’s general health.

In the study “Sunlight: For Better or For Worse? A Review of Positive and Negative Effects of Sun Exposure,” Dr. Han van der Rhee and his team reviewed 115 studies and found that there is no unequivocal scientific proof that eliminating time spent in the sun has a beneficial effect on the human body.

The researchers found that the present ‘epidemic’ of skin cancer is mainly caused by the increase of intermittent sun exposure, coinciding with the decrease of chronic exposure. Meaning that most people are just not outside in the sun on a regular daily basis. The researchers claim that it’s unlikely that continuous protection during daily life contributes to our health, particularly in countries with a temperate climate, and warns that both too much and too little sunlight may be harmful to our health.

full press release
 
Dr. Reinhold Vieth

Professor, University of Toronto, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.


Click to View Carole Baggerly

"Director, GrassrootsHealth, a Public Health Promotion Organization
leading D*action, the world's largest ongoing vitamin D intervention
project.
www.grassrootshealth.net"

 


Click to View Dr. John Cannell M.D.

Executive Director‚ The Vitamin D Council
San Luis Obispo, CA, USA

www.vitamindcouncil.com


 more advisors...

Converter Tool

In Canada Vitamin D 25(OH)D levels are measured in nmol/L. In the U.S. it is measured as ng/ml. To convert:

Enter nmol/L: ng/ml
Enter ng/ml: nmol/L