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LATEST VITAMIN D NEWS
 
UPCOMING EVENTS, BLOG AND NEW BOOKS
Autism: the protective effect of vitamin D in mice
Apr 24, 2017

The mother’s intake of vitamin D seems to have a protective effect on her offspring from the occurrence of autistic disorders in the event of prenatal infections. This conclusion emerges from a study in mice.

Prenatal exposure to infections is a possible predisposing factor to neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism. Since vitamin D has immunomodulatory and neuroprotective effects, researchers wanted to know if vitamin D supplementation could prevent the risk of autism under these conditions.

A lack of autistic behaviours in predisposed mice

To do so, researcher used mice in which autistic behaviours (stereotyped behaviours, difficulties in social interactions and basic learning) were caused by mimicking a prenatal exposure to a viral infection thanks to the substance poly(I:C).

full story . . .
New Medical Research Shows Vitamin D Deficiency Observed in Children, Adolescents and Adults with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Calling Attention to Managing Nutritional Requirements Related to IBS
Apr 05, 2017

- New study notes that children and adolescents with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) have a high incidence of vitamin D deficiency

- Corroborates earlier evidence of vitamin D deficiency among adults with IBS

- Since vitamin D deficiency can lead to increased risk of decreased bone mass, nutritional requirements related to IBS need attention

- Intestinal malabsorption emerging as an underlying factor in IBS

BOCA RATON, Fla., April 5, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- A recently published case-controlled study, entitled "Vitamin D status in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome,"1 found more than 90 percent of pediatric patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) were deficient in vitamin D. According to the lead study author from UMass Memorial Health Care, Benjamin U. Nwosu, M.D., these children "are definitely at risk for decreased bone mass." The study was published on February 13, 2017, in PLOS ONE, a peer-reviewed, open-access scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS), which covers primary research within science and medicine.

Dr. Nwosu said that he "was surprised that IBS had the highest prevalence of vitamin D deficiency of all gastrointestinal disorders we have studied in the past 5 years."

The study authors noted, "There is a much higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (in IBS) compared to IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease) and other malabsorption syndromes."  

 

full story . . .
Can a Lack of Vitamin D Contribute to the Likelihood of Getting MS?
Apr 03, 2017

The root for the word vitamin is "vita" from the Latin word meaning "life." Now researchers are finding that vitamin D can help the lives of people suffering with multiple sclerosis by reducing the recurrence of relapses, as well as by protecting those genetically or geographically at risk for developing the disease.

"When people have MS, their immune system doesn't know a friend from a foe, and it goes on hyper-alert attacking the protective myelin sheath covering nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. This process results in various and often progressive health problems in other parts of the body," explains Dr. Dusan Stefoski, associate professor of neurology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. "But there's a growing body of research showing the presence of vitamin D in the cells acts as regulator for the immune system so it no longer goes on the offensive."

 

full story . . .
New study finds more evidence for a link between vitamin D and autism
Mar 20, 2017

New research provides further evidence to suggest that sufficient vitamin D while pregnant can have health benefits for future children, with a recent Australian study suggesting that the vitamin could help prevent autism traits in offspring.

Autism -- or autism spectrum disorder -- is a lifelong condition where sufferers experience developmental disabilities such as an inability to communicate with others, interact socially, or fully comprehend the world.

In their animal study, a team of researchers from the University of Queensland's Queensland Brain Institute used the most widely accepted developmental model of autism, in which the mice behaved abnormally and demonstrated problems with social interaction and basic learning.

full story . . .
Link between Vitamin D treatment and autism prevention
Mar 17, 2017

Giving vitamin D supplements to mice during pregnancy prevents autism traits in their offspring, University of Queensland researchers have discovered.

The discovery provides further evidence of the crucial role vitamin D plays in brain development, said lead researcher Professor Darryl Eyles, from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute.

"Our study used the most widely accepted developmental model of autism in which affected mice behave abnormally and show deficits in social interaction, basic learning and stereotyped behaviours," Professor Eyles said.

"We found that pregnant females treated with active vitamin D in the equivalent of the first trimester of pregnancy produced offspring that did not develop these deficits."

full story . . .
11 surprising things you might not know about vitamin D
Mar 17, 2017

Many of us know it as the 'sunshine' vitamin that gives us strong teeth and bones.

But there's much more to it than that, which is why it's currently the vitamin on everyone's lips.

Research shows that this vital nutrient can help in a range of ways, from boosting immunity to potentially reducing the risk of a range of chronic illnesses.

Here are 11 vitamin D facts that may surprise you.

full story . . .
 
Events  
Joint International Symposia
Jun 21, 2017        

Vitamin D in Prevention and Therapy (June 21-22, 2017)

and

Biologic Effects of Light (June 22-23, 2017)

 Schlossberg Hotel Homburg, Germany

event details
THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE VITAMIN D – MINIMUM, MAXIMUM, OPTIMUM
Sep 22, 2017        8:00am

Medius Corporation is delighted to welcome you to the

 THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

VITAMIN D – MINIMUM, MAXIMUM, OPTIMUM

EVIDAS 2017

September 22-23, 2017 | Warsaw

event details
Blog  
Does the Sunshine Vitamin Really Work?
Apr 13, 2017

By Perry Holman, Executive Director, Vitamin D Society

Based on recent media reports you may be questioning or doubting if vitamin D really works. Does it really prevent cancer?

You may have seen these headlines:

High Doses of Vitamin D Fail to Cut Cancer Risk

Vitamin D pills may not protect against cancer after all

These were based on a new study published in JAMA by Lappe et al. It was a randomized controlled trial of 2,303 women which studied the effects of 2,000 IU/d of vitamin D3 and 1500 mg/d of calcium supplement vs placebo on cancer outcomes.

But it did reduce cancer. A new diagnosis of cancer was confirmed in 109 participants, 45 (3.89%) in the Vitamin D and calcium group and 64 (5.58%) in the placebo group. Tell me which group you would want to be in? I think that this is a great result and proves that vitamin D could help prevent cancer.

full post . . .
Editorial - An Epidemiologists Perspective
Mar 09, 2017

by Cedric F. Garland, Dr PH FACE, UC San Diego School of Medicine

When I was 10, I had a friend who was a terrific playmate and fellow canyon explorer. We'll call him Tom. He had a suspicious streak in him. He told me he thought that doctors knew how to prevent cancer and other diseases, but were not disclosing this to the public. I did not believe his ideas on this topic. I discounted Tom as a young fanatic, a conspiracy theorist. 
 
For about 20 years we have known that sunlight deficiency is the main cause of a terrible and progressive, ultimately disabling disease. People who grow up in Seattle have 10 times the incidence of the disease as people who grow up in San Diego. This applies across the globe - the higher the latitude, the higher the MS incidence rate. It is a law of nature and disease and has been shown through many epidemiological studies (see sidebar).
full post . . .
Lower vitamin D level linked to higher mortality rate in large European study
Feb 21, 2017

by William B. Grant, PhD

A new paper in the open-access journal reported the relation between vitamin D level and mortality rates based on a study of 26,916 individuals from a European consortium [Gaksch, 2017]. The countries involved were Denmark, Germany, Iceland, the Netherlands, and Norway. The average age of the participants at the time of enrollment ranged between 43 years in one German study to 76 years in the Iceland study. Average body mass index ranged from 23 in Denmark to 27 in one of the German studies. Women were slightly more represented than men. By the end of the studies, 6802 participants had died. The average follow-up time varied from 7.5 to 17.8 years. While vitamin D levels can change with time, the authors reported that follow-up time did not affect the findings.

So, what were the findings? All-cause mortality rate was minimal at 85 nmol/L (34 ng/mL). However, the findings were not considered significant for vitamin D levels above 50 nmol/L (20 ng/mL). This result is because there is not a one-in-twenty chance that the results for vitamin D levels above 50 nmol/L would be different from unity. At a vitamin D level of 10 nmol/L, the risk of death was 2.5 times that at 85 nmol/L.

full post . . .
Books  

Susan Rex Ryan
Defend Your Life

Defend Your Life has three main sections. The first addresses the fundamentals of vitamin D3 and its awesome benefits as well as minimal risk. The second highlights select diseases and conditions about which vitamin D3 may offer protection. The third includes the author's personal vitamin D3 story, including her theory about adequate vitamin D3 levels and how you can 'Defend Your Life'.

Reading this book will help you understand how adequate amounts of vitamin D3 are essential to enhancing your quality of life.


Ian Wishart
Vitamin D: Is This the Miracle Vitamin?

In this compelling new book,award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author Ian Wishart brings together the most up to date science on vitamin D and how it could well save your life. Cancer? Up to a 77% reduction in risk of developing it if you take this vitamin. Heart disease? The same kind of reduction. Did you know that autism, mental illness and multiple sclerosis all appear to be caused by a lack of vitamin D during pregnancy?

The lives of every single person, including you, will be affected by the information in this book. With more than 300 scientific trials and studies cited, this book is a reference guide not just for the general reader but for medical professionals alike.


 more books...

PRESS RELEASES
 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

Summer Smart Sunshine Tips to Boost Vitamin D Levels

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (April 4, 2017) – The daylight hours are getting longer, the sun is getting stronger and summer is just around the corner. Make this the year that you optimize your vitamin D levels through effective sun exposure. Enjoy the health benefits and disease prevention from optimal vitamin D levels and learn to control your risks from sun exposure.

Vitamin D is made naturally in your body when UVB rays from the sun convert cholesterol in your skin to pre-vitamin D3. We make about 90% of our vitamin D from UVB sun exposure. UVB rays are short and only reach the earth when the sun is directly above us. We can’t make vitamin D in the winter in Canada because the sun is at too low of an angle and the UVB rays are absorbed in the atmosphere.

You make vitamin D in Canada between the months of May and October. The best time for exposure is around midday, between 10am and 2pm, when the UV index is above 3 and your shadow is shorter than your height. The further you get from noon, the lower the amount of vitamin D you’ll make. The sun’s visible light may penetrate through glass, but UVB light will not therefore you will not make vitamin D.

full press release

Study finds Vitamin D effective for reducing flu and colds

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (March 1, 2017) – People who boost their vitamin D levels with supplements reduce their risk of respiratory tract infections, such as the flu, by up to 12%, according to a new systematic review and meta-analysis study of 25 randomised controlled trial (RCT) studies published recently in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

The study reported that this equates to one person being spared a respiratory tract infection (RTI) for every 33 taking vitamin D supplements. The benefit is greater in those receiving daily or weekly vitamin D versus bolus or monthly dosing, with the number needed to treat dropping to 20. The impact in Canada, based on a population of 35 million people, shows vitamin D could spare 1.75 million people having one RTI per year.

full press release

New Canadian study provides strong evidence that low vitamin D levels cause Alzheimer’s Disease

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (January 18, 2017) – A new scientific study published in Neurology from researchers at McGill University has provided evidence to support vitamin D as a causal risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The McGill study found that lower vitamin D levels increased the risk of Alzheimer’s disease by 25% using a Mendelian randomization (MR) methodology which minimizes bias due to confounding or reverse causation.

Alzheimer’s disease is expected to double throughout the world in the next 20 years. The Alzheimer Society of Canada estimates that approximately 747,000 Canadians are living with some form of dementia.

There is no treatment that can effectively stop the progression of Alzheimer’s disease despite considerable effort. Therefore, disease prevention through modifiable risk factors where possible is critical. Ensuring vitamin D sufficiency through increased non-burning sun exposure in summer or vitamin D supplementation may be a cost-effective approach to help reduce Alzheimer’s disease risk.

full press release
 
Dr. Reinhold Vieth

Professor, University of Toronto, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.


Click to View Dr. Michael Holick, Ph.D., M.D.

Professor of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics; Director of the General Clinical Research Unit; and Director of the Bone Health Care Clinic and the Director of the Heliotherapy, Light, and Skin Research Center at Boston University Medical Center.


Click to View Dr. Cedric Garland, DrPH

Professor Emeritus in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of California, San Diego.


 more advisors...

Converter Tool

In Canada Vitamin D 25(OH)D levels are measured in nmol/L. In the U.S. it is measured as ng/ml. To convert:

Enter nmol/L: ng/ml
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